Peperomia Plants Indoor Easy Planting Tips

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Peperomia

Peperomia Plants

We know that most foliage plants grow naturally as vegetation below the heavy canopy of tropical or subtropical trees and thus do not require direct sunlight. However, they do need some light for their life processes.

Many foliage plants with glossy green or variegated foliage can tolerate low light intensities indoors, and they have been much sought after since the early days.

Peperomia is one of these lovely indoor specimen plants, delightfully decorative and making precious feature materials for coffee tables, desks, kitchen benches, window sills, moss-sticks, and hanging pots or baskets, with hordes of other possibilities.

Peperomia Indoor Planting

Indoor planting is a pleasure one can indulge in and appreciate all year round. For those living in high-rise apartments who miss tending a garden, they can do the next best thing – bring nature indoors and, depending on their creativity, turn their homes into a garden of sorts.

We know that most foliage plants grow naturally as vegetation below the heavy canopy of tropical or subtropical trees and thus do not require direct sunlight. However, they do require some light for their life processes.

Many foliage plants with glossy green or variegated foliage can tolerate low light intensities indoors, and they have been much sought after since the early days.

But it was only during the last century that indoor or house plants have come into their own to form an essential part of living for plant lovers.

Some of these plants can be rather exacting, and cultivating the more delicate or exotic species is difficult, if not entirely impossible.

On the other hand, with a thorough knowledge of their growth and development requirements, it is not only possible to keep most of these exacting plants “at home” but also to successfully grow and cultivate them for your requirement.

With the present expansion of modern housing design, there is an ever-increasing number of amateur growers endeavoring to cultivate the prettiest or most unusual/exotic decorative plants in harmony with their interior decor.

You may even see magnificent specimens of rare decorative plants in various ways of presentation – in shallow dishes, growing on moss-sticks, in hanging baskets, wine glasses, or even terrarium (or bottle-gardening). All you need to look for are suitable plant materials.

Peperomia is one of these lovely indoor specimen plants, delightfully decorative and making lovely feature materials for coffee tables, desks, kitchen benches, window sills, moss-sticks, and hanging pots or baskets, with hordes of other possibilities.

Peperomias, which are members of the pepper family, is highly decorative with lovely foliage and have been valued as good indoor plant material for almost 100 years.

Primarily peperomias are fleshy-leaved foliage plants with a fascinating family, in which the individuals have a lot of things in common. These have been rated as the most useful, hardy, sturdy, and most unusual leaf patterns and variegations.

They love sunless windows, brighten up dark corners, and add color and interest to bookshelves and cabinets, and room dividers.

Peperomia Maintenance

What house or apartment does not have a dimly-lighted area that could not be improved by plants that do not require any pampering?

Actually, peperomias love filtered sunlight (just like in their natural habitat), but the light from an incandescent light bulb or a fluorescent lamp (daylight) will do as well.

The plant is very hardy, and frequent watering and special provisions are unnecessary. They can be very adaptive to modern home interiors, and it is a surprise they are not more widely used in interior decor.

There are rosette-like types with a very short stumpy stem and trailing types that can gracefully drape over from hanging baskets or pots.

Peperomia Varieties

The range of peperomias is far more extensive than most people would think. They are available in numerous shapes, sizes, and colors, with interesting growing habits.

One of the best-known and classic peperomia examples is the Peperomia argyreia – thick, smooth-leaved, emerald green, and heart-shaped with dark green stripes radiating to the tip. It has a bushy growth habit, a very short and stumpy stem, and appears to have a rosette habit of growth.

Then there is the Peperomia magnoliaefolia with thick variegated foliage and a creeping habit. This species is beneficial for hanging baskets and as “trailers” spilling over low planters or window boxes in low-light areas. This is the toughest species and has thick, strong foliage.

Another scandent variegated variety is Peperomia scandens variegata, ideal for hanging baskets, dish gardening, or even bottle gardening. Peperomia heteraefolia has smooth, grey-green heart-shaped leaves, each on individual waxy stems 10cm-12cm long.

It also comes in a dark foliage form called “Blackie,” and now you also have the new handsomely variegated variety under the name of “Pink Lady.”

Most peperomias have the best foliage color in slightly brighter (filtered) light, but “Pink Lady” only displays a deeper pink flush in moderate light. Stems are very waxy.

Though light is essential for all peperomias, they should be kept out of direct sunlight. Otherwise, the thick fleshy leaves will get scalded.

How to Plant Peperomia

All peperomias require an open soil mix as good drainage is essential. They are very susceptible to “wet feet.”

An ideal medium would be one with equal parts of good garden loam, coarse river sand, and peat (sifted, best grade is granulated peat) with a teaspoonful of slow-acting organic fertilizer. Each pot should have 15cm- 20cm of soil mix.

Peperomias are active growers and require a fair amount of water – a daily spray is necessary. Do not overwater; feel whether the soil is moist. The peat in the mix should keep enough moisture for the plant roots.

Peperomias can be divided up. Depot those that are not pot-bound and divide the individual plants, and pot them up separately.

Peperomias are easily propagated from leaf cuttings. A leaf with 1.5cm to 2cm length of leaf stalk attached can be inserted into coarse or medium grade sand or sand: peat in 1:1 ratio can be used as rooting medium.

Insert the leaf stalk all the way down into the sand or sand mix up to the point where the leaf stalk is joined to the leaf lamina.

Keep the pot of leaves moist.

In time, small plantlets will arise at the point of union and, when big enough, the leaf with the small plant attached can be potted up.

In the trailing or scandent varieties, stems can be taken from the other plant and inserted into the rooting medium.

In such cases, both stem cutting and leaf-cutting can be used for propagation. After they have taken root, they can be potted up separately as individual plants.